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A L A N   C U M M I N G       J E N N I F E R   J A S O N    L E I G H   

JOHN BENJAMIN HICKEY    RON RIFKIN    BLAIR BROWN  

 

When it opened on Broadway in 1966 it became a critical and popular success. Later, in that season, it won several Tony Awards including Best Musical, Score, Director and Supporting Actor & Actress.

In 1972 Bob Fosse directed the film adaptation and the result was one of the best and most successful movie musicals of the last decades. When it was Oscar time it won 8.

Since then this show became a classic, with several productions through the years and through different countries. But a few years ago someone decided to do a revised revival. Decadent and more sexual, it was a hit at London's Donmar Warehouse. It was this production that brought new life to CABARET and, in an even darker version, it became the actual Broadway success.

When you enter the theatre you feel like you are in a true cabaret of the thirties. Everything surrounding you gives you that feeling. It's like you have entered in a forbidden world of sin.

Then the show begins and, like they say in the song, in here life is beautiful. For a few hours you let the Emcee take you through a tale of love, sex and Nazism. Thanks to the creative minds of Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall this is an entirely new musical, one that grabs you by the collar and don't let you go. This is probably one of the most fascinating nights of theatre everyone ever had.

As the Emcee, Alan Cumming is absolutely terrific. He almost carries the entire show in his shoulders and maybe without him this revival would never had became the hit that it is. He is the soul of the show. At his side Jennifer Jason Leigh played a not very satisfying Sally Bowles. She and Blair Brown (who plays Fraulein Schneider) are too serious and failed to make you feel empathy toward their characters.

The rest of the cast was perfect and I personally loved the chorus girls and boys. Yes they're beautiful, but I don't believe they are virgins, do you?

 

Book by Joe Masteroff    Lyrics by Fred Ebb    Music by John Kander

Co-directed and Choreographed by Rob Marshall    Directed by Sam Mendes

Rated by Jorge: +++++